Sustainability initiative set for latest Sydney development

26.9.13Sydney is once again leading the way for sustainable practices with a new water recycling initiative. This new project aims to save homeowners money through the reuse of stormwater for basic household functions.

Green Square Water will utilise stormwater at 20 sites, which will be used to service 7,000 residents and 8,500 workers in the growing Green Square neighbourhood, providing up to 900 kilolitres of recycled water every day.

This will be particularly handy for apartment owners in the city, who are the highest consumers of water and waste one third of their water through flushing toilets and washing their laundry.

Lord Mayor Clover Moore said the program aims to make stormwater useful for businesses and residents alike, helping to benefit the environment and reduce the overall cost of water bills.

“The City is already working hard to reduce mains water demand, increase recycled water use and improve stormwater quality. We are already bringing storm and rainwater harvesting and reuse programs to many of our parks and public buildings,” said Ms Moore in a September 20 statement.

“Every year, over 20 billion litres of stormwater flows out to sea from the city – that’s nearly the same amount we expect Sydneysiders to be consuming in total by 2030.”

The Green Square neighbourhood is located four kilometres south of Sydney’s CBD has more than $400 million in infrastructure and community development to help create the residential precinct. It is expected to house 50,000 new residents by 2030.

With the increasing popularity of sustainable living throughout Australia and the world indicating a growing concern for the environment, future homeowners or property investors in the area could take this into account when searching for property.

Taking the time to look into cleaner, greener communities could help potential buyers to secure a fantastic investment property for the future, or simply find a dream home that contributes to the sustainability effort.Sydney is once again leading the way for sustainable practices with a new water recycling initiative. This new project aims to save homeowners money through the reuse of stormwater for basic household functions.

Green Square Water will utilise stormwater at 20 sites, which will be used to service 7,000 residents and 8,500 workers in the growing Green Square neighbourhood, providing up to 900 kilolitres of recycled water every day.

This will be particularly handy for apartment owners in the city, who are the highest consumers of water and waste one third of their water through flushing toilets and washing their laundry.

Lord Mayor Clover Moore said the program aims to make stormwater useful for businesses and residents alike, helping to benefit the environment and reduce the overall cost of water bills.

“The City is already working hard to reduce mains water demand, increase recycled water use and improve stormwater quality. We are already bringing storm and rainwater harvesting and reuse programs to many of our parks and public buildings,” said Ms Moore in a September 20 statement.

“Every year, over 20 billion litres of stormwater flows out to sea from the city – that’s nearly the same amount we expect Sydneysiders to be consuming in total by 2030.”

The Green Square neighbourhood is located four kilometres south of Sydney’s CBD has more than $400 million in infrastructure and community development to help create the residential precinct. It is expected to house 50,000 new residents by 2030.

With the increasing popularity of sustainable living throughout Australia and the world indicating a growing concern for the environment, future homeowners or property investors in the area could take this into account when searching for property.

Taking the time to look into cleaner, greener communities could help potential buyers to secure a fantastic investment property for the future, or simply find a dream home that contributes to the sustainability effort.

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